Miami Wins Bid for Super Bowl LIV

We are pleased to announce that the NFL has chosen Miami as the home of the Superbowl in 2020! This will be our record-breaking 11th Championship Game! The NFL will be celebrating its 100th anniversary.

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South Florida Super Bowl Committee

MIAMI’S
Super Bowl History

Miami shares its past with many historic Super Bowl moments in the
record-breaking ten times it has been held here.

Super Bowl II Logo

The Second AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional American football, later known as Super Bowl II, was played on January 14, 1968 at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. The National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers defeated the American Football League (AFL) champion Oakland Raiders by the score of 33–14.

Coming into this game, like during the first Super Bowl, many sports writers and fans believed that any team in the NFL was vastly superior to any club in the AFL. The Packers, the defending Super Bowl I champions, posted a 9-4-1 record during the 1967 NFL season before defeating the Dallas Cowboys, 21-17, in the 1967 NFL Championship Game (also popularly known as the Ice Bowl). The Raiders finished the 1967 AFL season at 13-1, and defeated the Houston Oilers, 40-7, in the 1967 AFL Championship Game.

As expected, Green Bay dominated Oakland throughout most of Super Bowl II. The Raiders could only score two touchdown passes from quarterback Daryle Lamonica. Meanwhile, Packers kicker Don Chandler made four field goals, including three in the first half, while defensive back Herb Adderly has a 60-yard interception return for a touchdown. Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr was named the Super Bowl MVP for the second time for his 13 of 24 passes for 202 yards and one touchdown.

Super Bowl III Logo

Super Bowl III was the third AFL-NFL Championship Game in professional American football, but the first to officially bear the name "Super Bowl" (The two previous AFL-NFL Championship Games came to be known, retroactively, as "Super Bowls"). The game, played on January 12, 1969, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida, is regarded as one of the greatest upsets in American sports history. The heavy underdog American Football League (AFL) champion New York Jets defeated the National Football League (NFL) champion Baltimore Colts by a score of 16–7. This was the first Super Bowl victory for the AFL.

Entering Super Bowl III, just like the previous two Super Bowls, many sports writers and fans believed that AFL teams did not have the same caliber of talent as NFL clubs, and thus fully expected the Colts to defeat the Jets. Baltimore posted a 13-1 record during the 1968 NFL season before defeating the Cleveland Browns, 34-0, in the 1968 NFL Championship Game. The Jets finished the 1968 AFL season at 11-3, and defeated the Oakland Raiders, 27-23, in the 1968 AFL Championship Game.

Undaunted, Jets quarterback Joe Namath made an appearance three days before the Super Bowl at the Miami Touchdown Club and brashly guaranteed a victory. His team backed up his words by controlling most of the game, and built a 16-0 lead through the fourth quarter off of a touchdown run by Matt Snell and three field goals by Jim Turner. Colts quarterback Earl Morrall threw three interceptions before being replaced by Johnny Unitas, who then led Baltimore to its only touchdown during the last few minutes of the game. Namath, who completed 17 out of 28 passes for 206 yards, was named the Super Bowl's Most Valuable Player, despite not throwing a touchdown pass in the game or any passes at all in the fourth quarter.

Super Bowl V Logo

Super Bowl V was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Baltimore Colts and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1970 season. The Colts defeated the Cowboys by the score of 16–13. The game was played on January 17, 1971, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida, the first Super Bowl game played on artificial turf.

This was the first Super Bowl played after the completion of the AFL-NFL Merger. As per the merger agreement, all 26 AFL and NFL teams were divided into 2 conferences with 13 teams in each of them. Along with the Colts, the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers agreed to join the 10 AFL teams to form the AFC. The remaining 13 NFL teams formed the NFC. This explains why the Colts represented the NFL in Super Bowl III, but not the NFC for Super Bowl V. Baltimore advanced to Super Bowl V after posting an 11-2-1 regular season record. Meanwhile, the Cowboys were making their first Super Bowl appearance after posting a 10-4 regular season record.

The game is sometimes called the "Blunder Bowl" or the "Stupor Bowl" because it was filled with poor play, penalties, turnovers, and officiating miscues. The two teams committed a Super Bowl record 11 combined turnovers in the game, and the Colts' 7 turnovers are currently the most ever committed by a winning team in a Super Bowl. Dallas also set a Super Bowl record with 10 penalties, costing them 133 yards. It was finally settled with five seconds left when Colts rookie kicker Jim O'Brien kicked a 32-yard field goal. In order to win the game, Baltimore had to overcome a 13–6 deficit at the half, losing their starting quarterback in the second quarter.

It is the only Super Bowl in which the Most Valuable Player Award was given to a member of the losing team: Cowboys linebacker Chuck Howley, who intercepted two passes (sacks and tackles were not yet recorded). Howley, the first non-quarterback to win the MVP award, refused to accept it because it was meaningless to him after his team lost. In a similar vein, Colts defensive end Bubba Smith would later refuse to wear his Super Bowl V ring because of the "sloppy" play.

Super Bowl X Logo

Super Bowl X was played between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1975 season. The Steelers defeated the Cowboys by the score of 21–17 to win their second consecutive Super Bowl.

The game was played at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida, on January 18, 1976, one of the first major national events of the United States Bicentennial year. Both the pre-game and halftime show celebrated the Bicentennial, while players on both teams wore special patches on their jerseys with the Bicentennial logo.

Super Bowl X featured a contrast of styles between the Steelers and the Cowboys, which were, at the time, the two most popular teams in the league. Pittsburgh, who dominated teams with their "Steel Curtain" defense and running game, finished the regular season with a league best 12–2 record and defeated the Baltimore Colts and the Oakland Raiders in the playoffs. The Cowboys, with their offense and "flex" defense, became the first NFC wild-card team to advance to the Super Bowl after posting a 10-4 regular season record and postseason victories over the Minnesota Vikings and the Los Angeles Rams.

Trailing 10-7 in the fourth quarter of Super Bowl X, the Steelers rallied to score 14 unanswered points, including a 64-yard touchdown reception by Pittsburgh wide receiver Lynn Swann. The Cowboys cut the score, 21-17, late in the game with wide receiver Percy Howard's 34-yard touchdown reception, but Pittsburgh safety Glen Edwards halted Dallas' rally with an end zone interception as time expired. Swann, who caught four passes for a Super Bowl record 161 yards and one touchdown, became the first wide receiver to be named the Super Bowl's Most Valuable Player.

Super Bowl XIII Logo

Super Bowl XIII was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1978 season. The Steelers defeated the Cowboys by the score of 35–31. The game was played on January 21, 1979, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida, the fifth and last time that the Super Bowl was played in that building.

This was the first ever Super Bowl rematch (the Steelers had previously beaten the Cowboys, 21–17, in Super Bowl X), and both teams were attempting to be the first club to ever win a third Super Bowl. Dallas was also the defending Super Bowl XII champion, and finished the 1978 regular season with a 12-4 record, and posted playoff victories over the Atlanta Falcons and the Los Angeles Rams. Pittsburgh entered the game after posting a 14-2 regular season record and playoff wins over the Denver Broncos and the Houston Oilers.

Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw, who was named Super Bowl MVP, completed 17 out of 30 passes for Super Bowl records of 318 passing yards and 4 touchdown passes. His 75-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter also tied Johnny Unitas in Super Bowl V for the longest pass in a Super Bowl. The Cowboys were able to stay close, only trailing 21-17 at the end of the third quarter, but Pittsburgh scored two touchdowns in a span of 19 seconds in the fourth period. Dallas also could not overcome turnovers, drops, and a controversial penalty during the second half. The Cowboys were eventually able to score two touchdowns in the final minutes of the game, but still ended up being the first defending champion to lose in the Super Bowl, and to date the only losing Super Bowl team to score 30 points or more.

Super Bowl XXIII Logo

Super Bowl XXIII was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Cincinnati Bengals and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion San Francisco 49ers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1988 season. The 49ers defeated the Bengals by the score of 20–16, winning their third ever Super Bowl. The game was played on January 22, 1989 at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida, the first Super Bowl hosted in the Miami area in 10 years, and the first in Miami not held at the Orange Bowl.

This was the second meeting between these two teams in the Super Bowl; their first meeting was seven years earlier. The game was also the third rematch between Super Bowl teams after Super Bowl XIII and Super Bowl XVII. This was the Bengals' second Super Bowl appearance after finishing the regular season with a 12-4 record. The 49ers were making their third Super Bowl appearance after posting a 10-6 regular season record.

The game is best remembered for the 49ers' fourth-quarter game-winning drive. Down 16-13, San Francisco got the ball on their own eight yard line with 3:10 on the clock and marched 92 yards down the field in under three minutes. They then scored the winning touchdown on a Joe Montana pass to John Taylor with just 34 seconds left in the game. The game was tight throughout. The teams combined for 5 field goals, and battled to a 3-3 score by the end of the second quarter, the first halftime tie in Super Bowl history. Cincinnati's only touchdown, a 93-yard kickoff return by Stanford Jennings in the third quarter, was quickly answered by a four-play, 85-yard drive that ended with San Francisco wide receiver Jerry Rice's 14-yard touchdown reception. Rice, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, caught 11 passes for a Super Bowl record 215 yards and a touchdown, while also rushing once for 5 yards.

Super Bowl XXIX Logo

Super Bowl XXIX was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion San Diego Chargers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion San Francisco 49ers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1994 season. The 49ers defeated the Chargers by the score of 49–26, becoming the first team to win five Super Bowls. The game was played on January 29, 1995 at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida (now part of the suburb of Miami Gardens).

This game is regarded as 49ers quarterback Steve Young's final leap out of the shadow of his predecessor, Joe Montana, who had won four Super Bowls with the 49ers, two with Young as the backup quarterback. With Young at the helm, and a defense consisting of several veteran free agents that joined the team during the previous off-season, San Francisco finished the regular season with a league-best 13-3 record, and led the league in total points scored (505). The Chargers, on the other hand, were regarded as a "Cinderella" team, and advanced to their first Super Bowl after posting an 11-5 regular season record and overcoming halftime deficits in both their playoff wins.

Young threw a record 6 touchdown passes en route to the Super Bowl MVP award. (His four TDs in a half tied Doug Williams from the Washington Redskins). He also completed 24 out of 36 passes for 325 yards, and was the top rusher of the game with 49 rushing yards (the first time both top passer and rusher were the same person). Two of Young's touchdown passes occurred on the 49ers' first two drives of the game. The Chargers were able to cut the deficit late in the first quarter, 14-7, on 13-play, 78-yard drive, but could not slow down San Francisco afterwards. Still, this became the first time that both teams scored in all four quarters of a Super Bowl. The combined aggregate score of 75 and the ten total touchdowns both remain Super Bowl records.

Despite the predicted blowout (18½ points is the largest margin a team has been favored by in a Super Bowl), and the fact that San Diego did not have as much national appeal nor a relatively large core fan base, the telecast of the game on ABC still had a Nielsen rating of 41.3.

Super Bowl XXXIII Logo

Super Bowl XXXIII was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Atlanta Falcons to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1998 season. The Broncos defeated the Falcons by the score of 34–19, winning their second consecutive Super Bowl. The game was played on January 31, 1999, at Pro Player Stadium in Miami, Florida.

The defending Super Bowl champion Broncos entered the game with an AFC-best 14-2 regular season record. The Falcons, under former Denver head coach Dan Reeves, were making their first Super Bowl appearance after also posting a 14-2 regular season record.

Aided by quarterback John Elway's 80-yard touchdown pass to receiver Rod Smith, Denver scored 17 unanswered points to build a 17-3 lead in the second quarter from which Atlanta could not recover. At 38 years old, Elway became the oldest player ever to be named Super Bowl MVP. As the final game of his career, he completed 18 of 29 passes for 336 yards, with one touchdown and one interception, and also scored a 3-yard rushing touchdown. Elway retired on May 2 before the following season.

Super Bowl XLI Logo

Super Bowl XLI was played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Indianapolis Colts and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Chicago Bears to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2006 season. The Colts defeated the Bears by the score of 29–17. The game was played on February 4, 2007, at Dolphins' stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.

This game featured two teams ending long Super Bowl appearance droughts. The Colts, who finished with a 12–4 regular season record, were making their first Super Bowl appearance since winning Super Bowl V in the 1970 season during the team's tenure in Baltimore; they had moved to Indianapolis in 1984. Meanwhile, the Bears, who posted an NFC-best 13–3 regular season record, were making their first appearance since winning Super Bowl XX in the 1985 season. In addition, the Bears' Lovie Smith and the Colts' Tony Dungy both became the first African-American head coaches to coach in the Super Bowl.

In the first Super Bowl played in rainy conditions, the Colts overcame a 14–6 first-quarter deficit to outscore the Bears 23–3 in the last three quarters. Chicago posted the earliest lead in Super Bowl history when returner Devin Hester ran back the opening kickoff 92 yards for a touchdown. But the Colts forced 5 turnovers, including cornerback Kelvin Hayden's 56-yard interception return for a touchdown, and Indianapolis kicker Adam Vinatieri made three field goals. Colts quarterback Peyton Manning was named the game's Most Valuable Player, completing 25 of 38 passes for 247 yards and a touchdown, with one interception for a passer rating of 81.8. This was Manning's first Super Bowl title after being one of the league's most dominant quarterbacks throughout his nine-year career.

Super Bowl XLIV Logo

Super Bowl XLIV was played between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New Orleans Saints and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Indianapolis Colts to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2009 season. The Saints defeated the Colts by a score of 31–17, earning their first Super Bowl win. The game was played at Dolphins' stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida on February 7, 2010 for the fifth time (and in South Florida for the tenth time), the latest calendar date for a Super Bowl yet.

This was the Saints' first Super Bowl appearance and the fourth for the Colts franchise. The Saints entered the game with a 13–3 record for the 2009 regular season, compared to the Colts' 14–2 record. In the playoff games, both teams placed first in their respective conferences, marking the first time since Super Bowl XXVIII (16 years previously) that both number one seeds have reached the Super Bowl. The Colts entered the Super Bowl off victories over the Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets, while the Saints advanced after defeating the previous year's runners up the Arizona Cardinals in their first game and the Minnesota Vikings in the second.

Down 10–6 at halftime of Super Bowl XLIV, in what many consider the turning point of the game, New Orleans successfully recovered a surprise onside kick on the second half kickoff, and subsequently took the lead on Pierre Thomas' 16-yard touchdown reception. The Colts responded with Joseph Addai's 4-yard touchdown run, but the Saints then scored 18 unanswered points, including Tracy Porter's 74-yard interception return for a touchdown, to clinch the victory. New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees, who completed 32 of 39 passes for 288 yards and two touchdowns, was named the Super Bowl MVP. His 32 completions tied a Super Bowl record set by Tom Brady in Super Bowl XXXVIII.

The live broadcast of the game on CBS was watched by an average US audience of 106.5 million viewers, making it the third most-watched Super Bowl. The National Anthem was sung by Carrie Underwood and the halftime show featured the British rock band The Who.

 
 

Our magnificent weather, beaches, world-class golf courses, restaurants, rich culture and ethnic diversity is what attracted over 100,000 visitors for Super Bowl XLIV and the Pro Bowl. Miami Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties came together once again to welcome the world and remind everyone that we are the premier Super Bowl destination.

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